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Amazing Pictures from The Aviary Cocktail Book

Since its opening in 2011, The Aviary has become one of the most internationally influential cocktail bars in the world. The founders of the bar, Grant Achatz and Nick Kokonas – creators and owners of Alinea restaurant in Chicago (which ranks 21th in theWorld’s 50 Best Restaurants list) – approach crafting cocktails the way they approach cooking, giving great attention to detail and proposing a wide selection of incredible drinks to their clients. The duo decided to collaborate with the Californian artists Allen and Sarah Hemberg to create a beverage cookbook…

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Seven Grüner Veltliner Wines to Try

To this day, I am baffled every time I need to explain that “yes, Austria is a wine country”. Not only does Austria make wine but it is, in my opinion, one of the leading wine countries on the planet when it comes to high-quality wines. The road to success was not easy for Austria. In the mid-1980’s after the so-called “diethylene glycol wine scandal”, Austrian wine exports hit rock bottom. The country didn’t start wallowing in self-pity but instead completely revamped. Stricter wine laws were applied and 30 decades…

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New Cantonese Cuisine in Hong Kong

The extraordinarily wide and wonderful world of Chinese cuisine has rarely been held in such high global esteem by diners and chefs alike. Ferran Adria told a World’s 50 Bestseminar that “It’s China, in particular, that excites me with its millennial gastronomic tradition, its minute attention to the health value of each dish”, while Dan Barber has argued that Chinese dishes represent “The future of what we should be eating.” It’s surprising then that arguably the country’s best-known cuisine, Cantonese, has somewhat lagged behind other Chinese regions when it comes…

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James Maxwell-Stewart: Cooking 'Full English' in Oslo

James Maxwell-Stewart still feels he has to defend British and more specifically English food from the atrocities of the past. “We’re suffering from this reputation from the 1950s to the 70s when no one gave a f*** about food or cooking,” says the Worcester-born chef. “It’s unfair. England has a lot of good ideas now … people have realised that.” He doesn’t have to convince me, a Brit, but rather the good people of Oslo, home to his restaurant, Cru Vin & Kjøkken. He’s been running the show there for…

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5 Dishes You’ll Love in Iceland

According to our contributor, if views and vistas were edible, you’d never go hungry in Iceland. Photos won’t fill your belly, of course, so thankfully there’s a ton of hearty things to munch on. Photo byArnar Valdimarsson/Flickr Traditional Icelandic meals that you may have heard of, like sheep’s face and various uses of offal, are getting harder to come by as younger generations make a decent income and have grown their palates to more European tastes. Subsistence farming to survive the cold of winter and eating what’s available while preserving…

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The Making of the Modern American Recipe

The first edition of the Boston Cooking-School Cook Book—now known as TheFannie Farmer Cookbook—reads like a road map for 20th-century American cuisine. Published in 1896, it was filled with recipes for such familiar 19th-century dishes as Potted Pigeons, Creamed Vegetables, and Mock Turtle Soup. But it added a forward-looking bent to older kitchen wisdom, casting ingredients such as cheese, chocolate, and ground beef—all bit players in 19th-century U.S. kitchens—in starring roles. It introduced cooks to recipes like Hamburg Steaks and French Fried Potatoes, early prototypes of hamburgers and fries, and…

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Why Is America Losing Ground in the Contest to Grow the World's Biggest Pumpkin?

Belgium is supposed to specialize in Brussels sprouts, but last autumn a horticulturist there raised a 2,624.6-pound pumpkin, squashing the world record for the heaviest fruit. American growers were dismayed. Pumpkins, after all, are indigenous to the New World. The first European settlers were stunned by the Native Americans’ ample squash crop, which they mistook for melon. Centuries later, pumpkins so impressed newly arrived Irish immigrants that they abandoned the turnips they’d carved into jack-o’-lanterns for All Hallows’ Eve back home. And pumpkins became an American Halloween doorstep classic. Yet…

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